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Bullying Prevention

Just Kidding 
By Trudy Ludwig and Adam Gustavson 

D.J.'s friend Vince has a habit of teasing D.J. and then saying, “Just kidding!" as if it will make everything okay. It doesn't, but D.J. is afraid that if he protests, his friends will think he can't take a joke. With the help of his father, brother, and an understanding teacher, D.J. progresses from feeling helpless to taking positive action, undermining the power of two seemingly harmless words. 

Nobody Knew What to Do: A Story About Bullying 
By Becky Ray Mc Cain and Todd Leonardo    

This story tells how one child found the courage to tell a teacher about Ray, who was being picked on and bullied by other kids in school.

Bystander Power: Now with Anti-Bullying Action
By Phyllis Kaufaman Goodstein     

Who has the most power to stop and prevent bullying? Teachers? Parents? The Principal of the Universe? No, no, and no way! When it comes to changing bullying behavior, nobody has more power than bystanders—all the people who see bullying or know about it . . . but do nothing.

Confessions of a Former Bully 
By Trudy Ludwig and Beth Adams
    
After Katie gets caught teasing a schoolmate, she's told to meet with Mrs. Petrowski, the school counselor, so she can make right her wrong and learn to be a better friend. Bothered at first, it doesn't take long before Katie realizes that bullying has hurt not only the people around her, but her, too. Told from the unusual point of view of the bullier rather than the bullied, Confessions of a Former Bully provides kids with real life tools they can use to identify and stop relational aggression.

Bullies are a Pain in the Brain 
By Trevor Romain  
 
Bullies are a pain in the brain—and every child needs to know what to do when confronted by one. This book blends humor with serious, practical suggestions for coping with bullies. Trevor Romain reassures kids that they're not alone and it's not their fault if a bully decides to pick on them. 

Speak Up and Get Along 
By Scott Cooper 

This book is a handy toolbox of ways to get along with others? A collection of 21 concrete strategies express themselves, build relationships, end arguments and fights, halt bullying, and beat unhappy feelings.  Each tool is clearly described, illustrated with true-to-life examples, and accompanied by dialogue and lines kids can practice and use. Stories and anecdotes show each tool in action. A terrific resource for any young person—and any adult committed to teaching social skills. Includes a note to adults.

Jake Drake Bully Buster 
By Andrew Clements
    
When Jake was three years old at Miss Lulu's Dainty Diaper Day Care Center, what did he know about bullies? Nothing. But he learned fast! Why? Because Jake was kind of smart and not a tattletale, and he had no big brother to protect him. He was a perfect bully magnet. But everything changed the year Jake was in second grade. Jake has to use all his smarts -- and his heart as well -- to turn himself from Jake Drake, Bully Magnet, to Jake Drake, Bully Buster.

My Secret Bully 
By Trudy Ludwig and Abigail Marble
 
Here is the all-too-familiar story of Monica.  She and Katie have been friends since kindergarten.  Monica loves being around her when she's nice.  But there are times when Katie can be just plain mean.  And Monica doesn't understand why.

Monica is a target of relational aggression, emotional bullying among friends who will use name-calling and manipulation to humiliate and exclude.  But with a little help from a supportive adult—her mother—Monica learns to cope and thrive by facing her fears and reclaiming power from her bully.

Including a foreword by the founder of the The Ophelia Project, as well as helpful tips, discussion questions, and additional resources, My Secret Bully is a vital resource for children, parents, teachers, and counselors. 

Bully 
By Patricia Polacco  
  
Lyla finds a great friend in Jamie on her first day of school, but when Lyla makes the cheerleading squad and a clique of popular girls invites her to join them, Jamie is left behind. Lyla knows bullying when she sees it, though, and when she sees the girls viciously teasing classmates on Facebook, including Jamie, she is smart enough to get out. But no one dumps these girls, and now they're out for revenge.

Tease Monster 
By Julia Cook   
 
When “One-of-a-Kind” is laughed at by Purple for being weird and Green playfully calls One a klutz after tripping on the stairs, is the Tease Monster to blame? With words of wisdom from Mom about the Tease Monster, One discovers that teasing is part of life. Not all teasing is the same. One learns that laughing at someone (mean teasing) has a hurtful bite, but laughing with someone is alright when it's not done out of spite. 

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